5 Questions for Larry Mayer

Larry Mayer UNH Professor
Larry Mayer is professor and director of the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering and director of the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire, USA. Hydro International asked him five questions

Faultlines, black holes and glaciers: mapping uncharted territories


In the era of satellites and Google Maps there are still areas that remain a mystery.

Mapping the extended continental shelf in the Arctic


Modern day explorers from the Arctic nations of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Russia, and the United States are setting their sights north to map the seabed and establish sovereign rights to resources in an icy area that just over a decade ago was virtually inaccessible.

A Quest to Map the Seafloor by 2030


Nearly 100 of the 137 crew members aboard the USS San Francisco were injured and one died when it ran into an unmapped underwater mountain southeast of Guam in 2005.

UNH Receives Multi-Million Dollar Contract for Underwater Acoustic Monitoring Research


DURHAM, N.H. – The University of New Hampshire’s School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering (SMSOE) has received a federal government contract worth up to $6.5 million to study ocean ecosystems through underwater acoustic research.

Nasa-Style Mission Needed to Map Ocean Floor


Ocean experts have called for international action to generate the kinds of maps of global seabeds that space missions have already returned for the Moon and Mars.

Largely Unknown Planet Earth


Welcome to life on a little-known planet. To date, more than 85 per cent of the seafloor has not been mapped using modern methods. Since 70 per cent of the Earth is covered in oceans, this means that we quite literally don’t know our own planet.

Scientists Implementing a Google Maps-esque Approach to Unearthing the Secrets of the World’s Oceans


GOOGLE’S mapping application has changed how we locate, navigate and plan our trips on land. Now, scientists are implementing a Google Maps-esque approach to unearthing the secrets of the world’s oceans.

In an Octopus’ Garden


THREE billion dollars sounds a lot to spend on a map. But if it is a map of two-thirds of Earth’s surface, then the cost per square kilometre, about $8.30, is not, perhaps, too bad.